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Jack Torres
Jack Torres

Gandhi the Man: How He Changed Himself and the World with Nonviolence and Love



# Gandhi the Man: A Book Review - Introduction - Brief summary of the book by Eknath Easwaran - Thesis statement: The book is a moving and inspiring account of Gandhi's life and teachings, based on the author's personal experience and admiration for the Mahatma. - Body - Paragraph 1: The author's background and motivation for writing the book - Easwaran grew up in Gandhi's India and witnessed his impact on the people and the nation - He wanted to share Gandhi's message of nonviolence, love, and self-transformation with the world - Paragraph 2: The main theme of the book: Gandhi's inner revolution - How Gandhi changed himself from a timid and unsuccessful lawyer to a fearless and influential leader - How he based his life on the Bhagavad Gita, the ancient scripture of India - How he practiced ahimsa (nonviolence), satya (truth), and brahmacharya (self-control) in every aspect of his life - Paragraph 3: The structure and style of the book - The book is divided into four parts: The Making of the Mahatma, The Way of Love, The Way of Nonviolence, and The Way of Self-Rule - The book uses anecdotes, quotations, photographs, and sidebar notes to illustrate Gandhi's personality and philosophy - The book is written in a simple and conversational tone, with a touch of humor and warmth - Paragraph 4: The strengths and weaknesses of the book - The book is a concise and accessible introduction to Gandhi's life and teachings - The book conveys the spirit and soul of Gandhi, rather than just the facts and events - The book inspires the reader to apply Gandhi's principles to their own lives and challenges - The book may not provide enough details or analysis for some readers who want a more comprehensive or critical biography of Gandhi - The book may reflect the author's personal bias or admiration for Gandhi, rather than a balanced or objective perspective - Conclusion - Restate the thesis statement: The book is a moving and inspiring account of Gandhi's life and teachings, based on the author's personal experience and admiration for the Mahatma. - Summarize the main points of the body paragraphs: The author's background and motivation, the main theme of Gandhi's inner revolution, the structure and style of the book, and the strengths and weaknesses of the book. - End with a recommendation: The book is a must-read for anyone who wants to learn more about Gandhi, his message of nonviolence, love, and self-transformation, and how to apply it to their own lives. Now here is the article I will write based on that outline: # Gandhi the Man: A Book Review Have you ever wondered how a shy and unsuccessful young lawyer became one of the most influential leaders in history? How did he inspire millions of people to follow his path of nonviolence, love, and self-rule? How did he transform himself from Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi to Mahatma Gandhi, the great soul? If you are curious about these questions, you may want to read Gandhi the Man, a book by Eknath Easwaran. In this book review, I will give you a brief summary of the book, its main theme, its structure and style, its strengths and weaknesses, and my recommendation. ## Introduction Gandhi the Man is a biography of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi written by Eknath Easwaran. It was first published in 1978 by Nilgiri Press. It has been revised several times since then. The latest edition was published in 2011. It has 217 pages. The book is not a typical biography that chronicles every detail or event in Gandhi's life. Rather, it is a personal and intimate account of Gandhi's inner revolution. It describes how Gandhi changed himself from a timid and unsuccessful lawyer to a fearless and influential leader. It also explains how he based his life on the Bhagavad Gita, the ancient scripture of India. It shows how he practiced ahimsa (nonviolence), satya (truth), and brahmacharya (self-control) in every aspect of his life. The author of this book, Eknath Easwaran, was a respected spiritual teacher and writer. He was born in 1910 in Kerala, India. He grew up in Gandhi's India and witnessed his impact on the people and the nation. He met Gandhi in person and attended his prayer meetings. He was deeply inspired by Gandhi's message of nonviolence, love, and self-transformation. He wanted to share this message with the world through his books and teachings. The main thesis of this book is that Gandhi was not a saint or a hero, but a human being like us. He had his flaws and weaknesses, but he also had a vision and a determination to overcome them. He was not born a Mahatma, but he became one through his own efforts and choices. He was not a miracle worker, but he showed us what is possible when we align our thoughts, words, and actions with our highest ideals. ## Body ### The author's background and motivation for writing the book Easwaran was a professor of English literature at the University of Nagpur in India. He was also a successful writer and speaker. He had a comfortable and successful life, but he felt something was missing. He felt restless and dissatisfied. He wanted to find a deeper meaning and purpose in his life. He began to search for answers in the spiritual traditions of India. He studied the Upanishads, the Vedas, the Yoga Sutras, and other ancient texts. He learned meditation and other spiritual practices. He also read the works of modern spiritual masters like Ramana Maharshi, Ramakrishna, Vivekananda, and Aurobindo. But the most influential figure in his spiritual journey was Gandhi. Easwaran admired Gandhi not only for his political achievements, but also for his personal transformation. He saw in Gandhi a living example of how to apply the wisdom of the Bhagavad Gita to everyday life. He saw how Gandhi used nonviolence, love, and self-rule as powerful tools for social change and personal growth. Easwaran wanted to share his insights and inspiration with others. He wanted to show that Gandhi's message was not only relevant for India, but also for the whole world. He wanted to show that Gandhi's message was not only for the past, but also for the present and the future. He wanted to show that Gandhi's message was not only for political leaders, but also for ordinary people like us. He decided to write a book about Gandhi's life and teachings. He did not want to write a dry or academic biography, but a lively and engaging one. He wanted to write a book that would capture the spirit and soul of Gandhi, rather than just the facts and events. He wanted to write a book that would inspire the reader to follow Gandhi's example and apply his principles to their own lives. ### The main theme of the book: Gandhi's inner revolution The main theme of this book is Gandhi's inner revolution. It is the story of how Gandhi changed himself from a timid and unsuccessful lawyer to a fearless and influential leader. Gandhi was born in 1869 in Porbandar, India. He belonged to a middle-class family of merchants. His father was the chief minister of a small princely state. His mother was a devout Hindu who taught him religious values. Gandhi was not a brilliant or confident student. He was shy, nervous, and tongue-tied. He had difficulty expressing himself in public or making friends. He was often bullied or ridiculed by his classmates. He married Kasturbai when he was 13 years old, as per the custom of his community. He had four sons with her. He loved his wife and children, but he also struggled with sexual impulses and jealousy. He went to London to study law when he was 19 years old. He hoped to become a successful barrister and earn respect and wealth. But he faced many challenges and disappointments in London. He had trouble adapting to the British culture and lifestyle. He had trouble finding clients or cases as a lawyer. He moved to South Africa in 1893 to work as a legal adviser for an Indian businessman. There he faced racial discrimination and injustice from the white authorities and settlers. He was thrown out of a train for sitting in a first-class compartment reserved for whites. He was beaten up by a mob for walking on a sidewalk meant for whites. These experiences awakened him to the plight of his fellow Indians living in South Africa as indentured laborers or traders. They also awakened him to his own dignity and courage as a human being. He decided to fight against the oppression and exploitation of Indians in South Africa using nonviolent means. He organized protests, petitions, marches, strikes, boycotts, civil disobedience, and court cases against the unjust laws and policies imposed by the British government. He also decided to change himself from within using spiritual means. He studied the Bhagavad Gita, the ancient scripture of India that teaches how to live according to one's dharma (duty). He experimented with various aspects of his life, such as diet, clothing, hygiene, celibacy, education, and service. He called his autobiography "The Story of My Experiments with Truth". Gandhi's inner revolution was not a sudden or easy process. It took him many years of struggle, sacrifice, and suffering. He faced many obstacles and oppositions from his family, friends, community, and enemies. He made many mistakes and learned from them. He also had many mentors and guides who helped him along the way. Gandhi's inner revolution was not a selfish or isolated endeavor. It was a social and political mission. He wanted to free India from British colonial rule and oppression. He wanted to uplift the masses of India from poverty, ignorance, and injustice. He wanted to unite the diverse religions and communities of India in harmony and brotherhood. He wanted to establish a new order of democracy, equality, and peace in India and the world. Gandhi's inner revolution was not a violent or aggressive campaign. It was a peaceful and nonviolent movement. He used the weapons of truth, love, and self-suffering to fight against the forces of falsehood, hatred, and violence. He appealed to the conscience and humanity of his opponents rather than hurting or humiliating them. He mobilized millions of people to join his cause by inspiring them with his example and leadership. Gandhi's inner revolution was not a final or perfect achievement. It was a continuous and humble journey. He never claimed to be a saint or a prophet. He always admitted his limitations and shortcomings. He always sought to improve himself and his methods. He always remained open to new ideas and experiences. He always regarded himself as a seeker of truth rather than a possessor of truth. ### The structure and style of the book The book is divided into four parts: The Making of the Mahatma, The Way of Love, The Way of Nonviolence, and The Way of Self-Rule. The first part covers Gandhi's early life from his birth in 1869 to his arrival in South Africa in 1893. It describes his childhood, education, marriage, profession, religion, and character. The second part covers Gandhi's transformation in South Africa from 1893 to 1914. It describes his encounters with racial discrimination, his discovery of the Bhagavad Gita, his experiments with truth and nonviolence, his campaigns for civil rights, his ashram life, and his family relations. The third part covers Gandhi's return to India in 1915 and his involvement in the Indian freedom struggle until 1921. It describes his reception by the Indian people, his role in the Indian National Congress, his participation in various movements such as Champaran, Kheda, Ahmedabad, and the Non-Cooperation Movement, his experiments with truth and nonviolence, his ashram life, and his family relations. The fourth part covers Gandhi's vision of self-rule or swaraj for India and the world. It describes his concept of village industries, education, health, sanitation, women's rights, communal harmony, and world peace. The book also has an introduction by the author, a conclusion by Timothy Flinders (a student of Easwaran), a chronology of Gandhi's life, a list of Gandhi's quotations used in the book, and a bibliography of sources. The book is written in a simple and conversational style. The author uses anecdotes, quotations, photographs, and sidebar notes to illustrate Gandhi's personality and philosophy. The author also shares his own reflections and insights on Gandhi's message and its relevance for today. The book has a touch of humor and warmth that makes it easy and enjoyable to read. ### The strengths and weaknesses of the book The book has many strengths that make it a valuable and inspiring read. Some of them are: - The book is a concise and accessible introduction to Gandhi's life and teachings. It covers the main events and aspects of his life without getting bogged down in too many details or dates. It gives a clear overview of his achievements and challenges as a leader and a human being. - The book conveys the spirit and soul of Gandhi, rather than just the facts and events. It shows how Gandhi lived his principles of truth, love, and nonviolence in every situation. It shows how Gandhi transformed himself from within by following the Bhagavad Gita. It shows how Gandhi inspired millions of people to join his cause by his example and leadership. - The book inspires the reader to apply Gandhi's principles to their own lives and challenges. It shows how Gandhi's message is not only relevant for India, but also for the whole world. It shows how Gandhi's message is not only for the past, but also for the present and the future. It shows how Gandhi's message is not only for political leaders, but also for ordinary people like us. The book also has some weaknesses that may limit its appeal or usefulness for some readers. Some of them are: - The book may not provide enough details or analysis for some readers who want a more comprehensive or critical biography of Gandhi. It may leave out some important events or aspects of his life that are relevant for understanding his context or impact. It may gloss over some of his controversies or failures that are worth exploring or learning from. - The book may reflect the author's personal bias or admiration for Gandhi, rather than a balanced or objective perspective. It may present Gandhi in a too positive or idealized light, without acknowledging his flaws or limitations. It may overlook or downplay some of his critics or opponents who had valid points or arguments against him. It may exaggerate or simplify some of his achievements or challenges to make them more impressive or dramatic. - The book may not address some of the current issues or questions that arise from Gandhi's legacy or relevance. It may not deal with some of the criticisms or challenges that Gandhi's message faces in today's world. It may not offer any practical guidance or suggestions on how to implement or adapt Gandhi's principles to different situations or contexts. ## Conclusion Gandhi the Man is a moving and inspiring account of Gandhi's life and teachings, based on the author's personal experience and admiration for the Mahatma. It describes how Gandhi changed himself from a timid and unsuccessful lawyer to a fearless and influential leader by following the Bhagavad Gita. It explains how he practiced truth, love, and nonviolence in every aspect of his life and inspired millions of people to join his cause of freedom and justice for India and the world. The book is a concise and accessible introduction to Gandhi's life and teachings that conveys his spirit and soul rather than just his facts and events. The book inspires the reader to apply Gandhi's principles to their own lives and challenges. The book is written in a simple and conversational style with anecdotes, quotations, photographs, and sidebar notes. The book may not provide enough details or analysis for some readers who want a more comprehensive or critical biography of Gandhi. The book may reflect the author's personal bias or admiration for Gandhi rather than a balanced or objective perspective. The book may not address some of the current issues or questions that arise from Gandhi's legacy or relevance. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn more about Gandhi, his message of nonviolence, love, and self-transformation, and how to apply it to their own lives. It is a book that can change your life and the world for the better. ## FAQs - Q: Who is the author of Gandhi the Man? - A: The author is Eknath Easwaran, a respected spiritual teacher and writer who grew up in Gandhi's India and met him in person. - Q: What is the main theme of the book? - A: The main theme of the book is Gandhi's inner revolution, how he changed himself from a timid and unsuccessful lawyer to a fearless and influential leader by following the Bhagavad Gita. - Q: How is the book structured and styled? - A: The book is divided into four parts that cover Gandhi's early life, his transformation in South Africa, his return to India and his involvement in the freedom struggle, and his vision of self-rule or swaraj for India and the world. The book is written in a simple and conversational style with anecdotes, quotations, photographs, and sidebar notes. - Q: What are some of the strengths and weaknesses of the book? - A: Some of the strengths of the book are that it is a concise and accessible introduction to Gandhi's life and teachings that conveys his spirit and soul rather than just his facts and events. It inspires the reader to apply Gandhi's principles to their own lives and challenges. Some of the weaknesses of the book are that it may not provide enough details or analysis for some readers who want a more comprehensive or critical biography of Gandhi. It may reflect the author's personal bias or admiration for Gandhi rather than a balanced or objective perspective. It may not address some of the current issues or questions that arise from Gandhi's legacy or relevance. - Q: Who should read this book? - A: Anyone who wants to learn more about Gandhi, his message of nonviolence, love, and self-transformation, and how to apply it to their own lives.




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